SILK ON THE ROAD
       
     
Testamur
       
     
Edible Plants in Art
       
     
HOLDING THE LINE
       
     
UNDER ICE
       
     
REIMAGINED PERSPECTIVES
       
     
Urban Fragments
       
     
JUST PLAYING
       
     
hold tight, tomorrow
       
     
M16 Studio Artists
       
     
210 DEDREES
       
     
Hands On Studio show
       
     
Singular Archivists
       
     
NEXUS
       
     
Project Reflect
       
     
Amalgam
       
     
CITY LIGHTS
       
     
AUSTRALIAN LANDSCAPES
       
     
BLOCK BY BLOCK
       
     
CLOUD 9
       
     
ODD - A LITTLE
       
     
PORTRAITS
       
     
H2O
       
     
FALSE PERSPECTIVES
       
     
XPERIMENTAL
       
     
UNREAL
       
     
PERCEPTION
       
     
Bird Years
       
     
UP WE GO
       
     
ARTFLUX
       
     
EARTH DREAMING
       
     
Wrapped in Sky
       
     
EVOLVE
       
     
LOSS
       
     
Readymades
       
     
If you were buried for a thousand years even you would be priceless.
       
     
Osculate
       
     
It is. They are.
       
     
Gesture Light
       
     
Rebirth of Reason
       
     
Crises of Content
       
     
Tar Love - What Lies Beneath
       
     
Bled
       
     
KW@N3$
       
     
Drawing Comfort
       
     
Entangled Mysteries
       
     
Infrastructure
       
     
Self ID
       
     
Templum
       
     
Amplified
       
     
Internationalist
       
     
The unconscious is a rectangle
       
     
Empty Vessels and Full
       
     
Lines of Site: Finding the Sublime in Canberra
       
     
Transit Lane
       
     
The Structure of Things
       
     
Material World
       
     
Orchestrated Chaos
       
     
Hands on Studio
       
     
Figurative Visions: Three Artists; Three mediums
       
     
Liminal Landscapes
       
     
Skating on Thin Ice
       
     
Underneath Tomorrow
       
     
6 Cubic Centimeters
       
     
Faces in Watercolour
       
     
The Darkness Torch
       
     
The age of meaninglessness has ended, Art, Empirical and Ideal
       
     
The Elm Forest
       
     
Labyrinths of the Mind
       
     
Recent Small Paintings
       
     
Together Apart
       
     
The Palm House
       
     
Green Space: scenes from the Bush Capital
       
     
Beyond Worlds and Words
       
     
Breathing Space
       
     
New Work
       
     
m8
       
     
The Onlooker
       
     
Paradise Lost
       
     
8 Paintings
       
     
Kinetic Light
       
     
Faded Crush
       
     
Time Takes Too Much Time
       
     
Orpheus Island
       
     
Polarising Colour
       
     
The Plate Show
       
     
Intersections
       
     
aethër
       
     
The Earth Element: Life's Fragility
       
     
NEW WORK
       
     
Bloom
       
     
FEET ON THE GROUND
       
     
SILK ON THE ROAD
       
     
SILK ON THE ROAD

Jeffree Skewes

Gallery 1

27 September - Sunday 14 October 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 27 September

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 14 October

Silk on the Road represents the culmination of combining specific artworks with the artist’s poetry presented as an exhibition of paintings, poetic works, installation and associated book launch.

It is a lucid rendering of an allegorical journey that takes place over an inexact time, across my imagined and fabled lands of the Silk Road.

Image: Silk on the Road - Artist's Book of poetry and artworks - cover piece (detail), rice paper, silk, acrylic paint on canvas.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

Testamur
       
     
Testamur

Canberra Art Workshop

Gallery 2

27 September - Sunday 14 October 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 27 September

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 14 October

Showcasing CAW Special Events Tutors and their

Influence on our Art Development.

Image: Lori Smith, Crayon Boy, 2018, oil on canvas, 39 x 49cm.

Edible Plants in Art
       
     
Edible Plants in Art

The Watercolour Group

Gallery 3

27 September - 14 October

Opening 6pm Thursday 27 September

The intimate relationship between humans and plants has, through the ages, been central to the development of civilisation. Plants affect every aspect of our lives; diet, economics, customs, healing practices and artistic endeavour.

From the earliest civilisations plants were the subjects of drawings and paintings. The painting of food became a popular genre for Spanish Renaissance artists.

This series of Still Life paintings worked in gouache on black gesso takes a more modern look at edible plants in art. Works are in gouache on black gesso and incorporate traditional geometric two point perspective.

Image: Arjen Romeyn, Edible Plants, Goauche on black gesso, 70cmx50cm

HOLDING THE LINE
       
     
HOLDING THE LINE

Bruce Tunks

Gallery 1

6 September - Sunday 23 September 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 6 September

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 23 September

Holding the Line, a collection of paintings and sculptures, is an on-going exploration of line and energy in nature. It is a reaction to the ‘language’ of the landscape and examines the importance of line in structure formation and the relationship of these structures to the space in which they exist.

Image: Bruce Tunks, Aesthete, 2017, steel, 57 x 14cm.

Photo: Benita Tunks, courtesy of the artist.

UNDER ICE
       
     
UNDER ICE

Justine McLaren

Gallery 2

6 September - Sunday 23 September 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 6 September

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 23 September

Under Ice is a solo exhibition by sculptor craftswoman Justine McLaren. Her wired objects reflect the theme of the limits of existence and the wonder of survival in extreme circumstances.

Under Ice is a visual response to the artist’s research on the sea creatures that live under the Amery and Ross Sea Ice Shelves of Antarctica. Combining traditional weaving methods with contemporary materials such as discarded data cable and telephone wires, McLaren re-forms animals only recently discovered by humans.

Image: Justine McLaren, Andrillamps, 2018, wire, 65cm x 90cm x 35cm

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

REIMAGINED PERSPECTIVES
       
     
REIMAGINED PERSPECTIVES

Madisyn Zabel

Gallery 3

6 September - Sunday 23 September 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 6 September

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 23 September

Reimagined Perspectives is a solo exhibition by Madisyn Zabel that explores the contrasts and tensions that exist between three-dimensional objects and their flat representations through glass and mixed media installations.

Within this exhibition, Zabel creates a dialogue between geometric forms made from glass and their projected shapes in space. Opposing positive and negative forces, this visual collision invites us to rethink the space, the volume and the relationship between virtual and physical shapes.

Images:Madisyn Zabel, Split Detail, 2018, glass paint metal,

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

Urban Fragments
       
     
Urban Fragments

Phil Page

Gallery 1

16 August - Sunday 2 September 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 16 August

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 2 September

Urban Fragments will present paintings which interrogate aspects of Canberra’s urban palimpsest, where the layers of its history have only been partly erased. It will use layered imagery to explore some urban incidents of this relatively young city and the environmental interventions that have made it.

Image: Philip Page, Paris Aerial 2, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 92 x 122cm.

Photo: courtesy of Dorian Photographs.

JUST PLAYING
       
     
JUST PLAYING

Clare Martin and Mike O'Kane

Gallery 2

16 August - Sunday 2 September 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 16 August

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 2 September

“Undirected spontaneous play is a vital part of creativity. Our art often starts with a spontaneous undirected type of play, similar to a child’s exploration or make-believe.” The artworks in Just Playing aim to preserve this light, with a sometimes joking, sometimes role-playing, point of departure. Now, what happens when play becomes more dark and sinister?

Clare Martin is a sculptor based in the Canberra region. Mike O’Kane teaches art at Otago University NZ.

Image: Clare Martin, Dream Home, 2018, mixed media, detail.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

hold tight, tomorrow
       
     
hold tight, tomorrow

Kendall Kirkwood

Gallery 3

16 August - 2 September 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 16 August

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 2 September

History is always a reflection of the present direction society is thinking of taking. Our perception of then reveals who we are now in relation their understanding of how they thought the World ought to be and this depth provides scope for more chapters. Women, throughout history, have been equally plunged in these depths. But they have only relatively recently started to inhabit those chapters. hold tight, tomorrow aims to contribute to this movement. To give Anon a name. To give thought to all those women who have been broken by a society which did not understand the immensity of their creative capacity as they were living so far ahead of their time. This is not a stable series about loss. Rather, it is a dynamic collection exploring the incredible presence which breathes in their absence. These women stood strong in their differences against so many defences they fought to follow such previously abstract notions into knowing we too must hold on through the difficult, even when things seem impossible. Tomorrow will come and so will perspective.

Image: Kendall Kirkwood, sometimes, 2018, photograph.

M16 Studio Artists
       
     
M16 Studio Artists

M16 Studio Artists

Gallery 1

26 July - Sunday 12 August 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 26 July

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 12 August

M16’s studio artists present their annual group exhibition. Representing a broad cross-section of Canberra’s artistic practitioners, the exhibition highlights the diversity of professional art practice at M16 through paintings, prints, drawings, jewellery and objects produced by both established and emerging artists.

Image: Liz Faul, Distant Sun, 2018, gouache, found image release print, recycled printed material, collage.

210 DEDREES
       
     
210 DEDREES

Studio Artists of Canberra Art Workshop

Gallery 2

26 July - Sunday 12 August 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 26 July

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 12 August

Canberra Art Workshop is a thriving studio centre for the arts in the M16 Artspace. We welcome all artists, from complete beginners to practicing professionals. Humans have a wide field of view of slightly more than 210 degrees. Members of CAW produce artworks in a surprisingly wide range of genres, mediums and techniques. This exhibition presents a range of work including life drawing, pastel, watercolour, portraiture, print making and others – all made in Canberra Art Workshop’s studio.

Image: Prue Power, Still Life with Cat, 2017, acrylic on canvas, detail.

Photo: courtesy of M16 Artspace.

Hands On Studio show
       
     
Hands On Studio show

Artists of Hands on Studio

Gallery 3

26 July - Sunday 12 August 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 26 July

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 12 August

This exhibition showcases works by Hands-On Studio members. The works explore story-telling and were all produced from Hands-On classes in 2017. Hands-On Studio is an arts organisation run by CatholicCare housed at M16 Artspace which seeks to provide people with disabilities access to an art education. One of the studio’s objectives is to provide these artists with as many opportunities as possible to exhibit in mainstream gallery spaces.

Image: Installation shot of Hands on Studio's 2017 exhibition in Gallery 3.

Photo: courtesy of M16 Artspace.

Singular Archivists
       
     
Singular Archivists

Llewellyn McGarry, Dierdre Pearce, Isobel Rayson, Alison Moeller and Kate McCambridge

Gallery 1a

5 July - Sunday 22 July 2018

In singular archivists the artists are exploring ways of registering their everyday presence at different levels of proximity with the surrounding space: bodily, domestic, environmental and digital. The discovery of place, the experimentation of mark-making, record-keeping practices and engagement with their environments are evident in the exhibited work. As artists, they use a combination of performance and documentary practices including photography, drawing, digital archiving and physical objects which evidence their presence in each space and the traces they leave behind.

Image: Dierdre Pearce, Alison Moeller and Kate McCambridge, one of the series fragments of an imagined existence, 2017, digital photograph documenting performance, Domain de Boisbuchet, Lessac, France, August 2017.

Photo credit: Dierdre Pearce, Alison Moeller and Kate McCambridge.

NEXUS
       
     
NEXUS

Brian Hincksman

Gallery 1b

5 July - Sunday 22 July 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 5 July

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 22 July

Hincksman's works in Nexus tend towards the abstract in order to suggest a connectivity between humans and all living things in the natural environment. The exhibition will have a dual focus; painting and poetry, with live readings on the opening night. The paintings enter a dialogue of philosophy, physics and psychology simply bu their construction. Technique is therefore as important as the end result, with Hincksman considering composition all manner of things, not just structural or visual; intuition, instinct, emotion and the subconscious mind play more of a role.

Image: Brian Hincksman, The Octopus, 2018, Acrylic on canvas, 90 x 60cm

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

Project Reflect
       
     
Project Reflect

Allison Jonas Young

Gallery 2

5 July - Sunday 22 July 2018

‘Project Reflect’ is Allison Jonas Young’s most recent series of artworks. Within each circular panel we find two smaller circles, two parts within the whole. Each of the two smaller circles are mirrors to each other’s missing bits. These pairs are not incongruous, while they may appear quite different from one and other they are in fact a perfect match. Like any good complementary opposite they complete each other, they balance each other out and create harmony together.

Image: Allison Jonas Young, Luck And Openness, 2017, Acrylic on Timber, 30cmØ x 2.2cm, Photo: Allison Jonas Young

 

Amalgam
       
     
Amalgam

Phil Alldis

Gallery 3

5 July - Sunday 22 July 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 5 July

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 22 July

'I like working with found imagery and find something interesting about images removed from their context. The compositions are generated in Photoshop, where I have played around with imagery from different sources, ranging from the obscure to the personal, cropping, layering, flipping and distorting until something which is intriguing to me emerges. I have allowed for intuition to play a central role in the process and the accumulation of image-upon-image.' - Phil Alldis

Alldis focuses on the division of space within composition, and the subtle influences of modernism in his exhibition. He is particluarly attracted, in this exhibition, to the use of text as part of his dialogue with tone, pattern and shape. The artist explores with forms and spaces until a composition achieves 'rightness'.

Image: Phil Alldis, b53, 2017, charcoal and wax on canvas, 71 x 56 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

CITY LIGHTS
       
     
CITY LIGHTS

Julie Spencer

Gallery 1

14 June - Sunday 1 July 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 14 June

Guest Speaker: Terence Maloon, Director, Drill Hall Gallery, ANU

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 1 July

In style of the Impressionists, Spencer’s exhibition hopes to capture the sense of atmosphere in the urban experience. The diffused and dappled light of rainy nights transforms the solid city scape in to atmospheric hustle and bustle. Her practice is to '..thinly apply and drip paint like falling rain, as if jewels or stained glass windows and thickly textured paint, scratched back, and overlaid until the canvas is glowing.' The lucid and gestural style of her work reflects perfectly her subject matter.

Listen to Julie Spencer talk about City Lights in an interview she did with Living Arts Canberra. Click Here

Image: Julie Spencer, Rendezvous 9pm, 2018, Oil on Canvas, 56 x 40cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

AUSTRALIAN LANDSCAPES
       
     
AUSTRALIAN LANDSCAPES

Tim Brook

Gallery 2

14 June - Sunday 1 July 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 14 June

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 1 July

Australian Landscapes is an immersive installation of quiet, slow and contemplative digital video work. Every image is a celebration of the unexpected beauty of that Australian icon, the corrugated-iron fence. It is a close study of surface detail that is intended to evoke memories of the colours and textures of outback experiences. Many of the images involve paint that is dripping, fading or peeling, but the images remain photographic, not painterly. The patterns were formed by random processes until they were captured in the photographic frame—they were not carefully constructed like the paintings of Pollock and the Abstract Expressionists who have inspired this exhibition. After all, it is the delicacy of detail and the harshness of ground that is so characteristic of corrugated-iron.

Listen to Tim Brook talk about Australian Landscapes in an interview he did with Living Arts Canberra. Click Here

www.hingstonbrook.com/iron/

Image: Tim Brook, Boulder WA No. 6, 1995, digital photograph, 1920 x 1080 px.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

BLOCK BY BLOCK
       
     
BLOCK BY BLOCK

Jenny Blake

Gallery 3

14 June - Sunday 1 July 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 14 June

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 1 July

Blake says her exhibition was inspired by an ABC documentary about excessive landfill. 'The program piqued my awareness of waste. After finding a builders rubbish skip full of pine off cuts, I was compelled to rescue the wood blocks from landfill. Wood is a precious resource and can stored carbon long after the trees has been harvest. My new mission now - to repurpose the off cuts, block by block. Using acrylics and pallet knives, I manipulated the paint, layering, scalping and sanding back to find natural ridges and knots. The wood surface allowed a tough and energetic approach, while exposing the gentle vulnerability in the fine lines nature had composed. The wood lines reveal and mimic mountain ranges and seascapes, while presenting a constant flow of energy.' The artist heroically brings new life to this tragic chapter. 'Block by block the wasted off cuts were rescued and nurtured to embody a new life, a new landscape brought into being as an ode to their previous life.'

Listen to Jenny Blake talk about Block by Block in an interview she did with Living Arts Canberra. Click Here

Image: Jenny Blake, Wave, 62 x 45cm, Acrylic on Wood Assemblage.

Photo: Oliver Armstrong

CLOUD 9
       
     
CLOUD 9

Chris Holly

Gallery 1

24 May - Sunday 10 June 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 24 May

Exhibitions continues until 5pm Sunday 10 June

Things are looking up. To explore the nature and character of a vapour is to be on cloud nine. 

The highest level of the sky in numerous cultural traditions and mythology is the 9th level. The idiom “being on cloud nine” is an expression of happiness and delight. The cloud is a physical state of water; that being when the air reaches a condition where it cannot hold water as a gas, the water condenses into tiny drops and a cloud forms. Images of clouds are both a literal and populist interpretation of skyscapes.However, clouds provide a challenging opportunity to explore a subject that is both transient and ubiquitous in its character and nature. It is to attempt to document the face of transience. This body of work is a series of photographic sketches and portraits of clouds and their many moods. Shot over many seasons and across many locations around the world, on both film and digital media, this series is small collection of a larger body of work known as the Biome Project in which I seek to document all aspects of the earth’s biosphere. 

Image: Chris Holly, Untitled, 2017, digital type C, 60 x 60 cm. 

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

 

ODD - A LITTLE
       
     
ODD - A LITTLE

Manuel Pfeiffer

Gallery 2

24 May - Sunday 10 June 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 24 May

Exhibitions continues until 5pm Sunday 10 June

Painted interpretations of pieces of music.

In his exhibition Odd - a Little Manuel Pfeiffer will interpret pieces of music, mostly jazz, by musicians such as saxophonist Yusef Lateef and pianist Keith Jarrett. For every piece of music, Pfeiffer will create two versions: the first interpretation of the music, and a reinterpretation of the first painting - or as a jazz player would say, a ‘second take’.

Image: Manuel Pfeiffer, one, 2017, acrylic and red dust on canvas, 30 cm x 40 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

 

PORTRAITS
       
     
PORTRAITS

Rachael Bruhn

Gallery 3

24 May - Sunday 10 June 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 24 May

Exhibitions continues until 5pm Sunday 10 June

Bruhn’s photographic exhibition documents the portraits of people in the artists life. The show was first exhibited in 1990, and its reprisal will reflect time passing through the ageing of each sitter. The artist will focus on the curation of the room, with the portraits forming a ‘landscape’ of people and their stories.

Image: Racheal Bruhn, Gerard Foley (detail), 2017, inkjet on rag, 30 x 90 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

 

H2O
       
     
H2O

Anthony Fleming

Gallery 1

3 May - Sunday 20 May 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 3 May

Exhibitions continues until 5pm Sunday 20 May

“With every drop of water you drink, every breath you take, you're connected to the sea. No matter where on Earth you live. Most of the oxygen in the atmosphere is generated by the sea.”

- Sylvia Earle, Marine Biologist

Water covers 75% of the Earth’s surface in the form of ice, rivers, lakes and seas. This body of work explores colour, luminosity and scale through the medium of photography. These photographs use framing and focus to accentuate the abstract beauty of the waters of Antarctica, the NSW Sapphire Coast and the Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre National Park.

Antarctica has sublime landscapes and icebergs. The lighting of the Sapphire Coastline has a unique quality giving rise to dramatic sunrises and sunsets that illuminate the abundant waterways including lakes, rivers and creeks. Kalamurina borders the Simpson Desert Regional Reserve and Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre National Park. The desert landscape is vast and ephemeral. 

Image: Anthony Fleming, Barragga Bay, 2017, inkjet print 42 x 59 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

 

FALSE PERSPECTIVES
       
     
FALSE PERSPECTIVES

Caroline Ambrus & Lucile Carson

Gallery 2

3 May - Sunday 20 May 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 3 May

Exhibitions continues until 5pm Sunday 20 May

A collaborative effort between Carson and Ambrus has physically manifested in visual re-telling of the childhood classic, The Wizard of Oz. The artists use warped light and a clever fusion of flat and 3D perspective to create an immersive installation.

Image: Caroline Ambrus, False Perspectives, 2017, oil on board, 120 x 120cm

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

 

XPERIMENTAL
       
     
XPERIMENTAL

Experimental Painting Workgroup,

Ross Andrews, Robyn Banks, Robyn Booth, Loli Butler, Jane Dunn, Catherine Ellerton, Michele England, Joanne Mahler Fenderson, Val Gee, Ann Gordon-Smith, Margaret Harrison-Smith, Velda Hunter, Diana Jamieson, Diana McPhetres, Betty Pearson, Annette Rennie, Lori Smith, Julie Spencer, Judy Stevenson, Irena Zarobski; curated by Michele England

Gallery 3

3 May - Sunday 20 May 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 3 May

Exhibitions continues until 5pm Sunday 20 May

A group show by some of Canberra Art Workshop’s studio artists that encompasses a variety of methods, mediums and intentions. The only common denominator is the letter ‘X’ which must be the visual or conceptual crux of each piece. The Canberra Art Workshop is an arts organisation at M16 Artspace.

Image: Installation view looking east

Photo: courtesy of M16 Artspace.

UNREAL
       
     
UNREAL

Casey Crockford, Chloe Gray, Alex Hobba, Kon Kudo, Josh Owen, Luis Power, Rebecca Worth

Gallery 1b + 2

12 April - Sunday 29 April 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 12 April

Exhibitions continues until 5pm Sunday 29 April

In a world of the ‘Insta’, a culture of personalised media to promote activity and event; ‘I was there, that happened, this exists’, Photography has come to exists as fact and evidence of our lives; but what happens when we re-claim photographic reality to depict the unreal? The eclectic combination of photomedia, installation and sculpture, brought together in Unreal, is an investigation of this very question. When the record of light and reality is combined with the creative manipulations of the artist, how much of the photographic reality remains? How is our traditional definition of photography re-imagined to encompass contemporary photography?

Image: Rebecca Worth, Auroral 3, 2017, digital print from medium format negative, 90 x 80cm

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

 

PERCEPTION
       
     
PERCEPTION

Kate Bender & Janet Angus

Gallery 1a

12 April - Sunday 29 April 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 12 April

Exhibitions continues until 5pm Sunday 29 April

Perceptions is a joint exhibition with Janet Angus and Kate Bender, artists who explore the depiction of paradoxical spaces and ambiguous forms and the tensions that are created by multiple perspectives. Traditionally, Angus seeks to reflect an inner state of mind, with the intention of eliciting an emotional response via the materials of oil on board. Bender’s bold and engaging abstract oil on canvas constructions embody the representation of light, and the perception of, and interplay between space and form. Through a similar material the artists achieve entirely different things. For this exhibition Angus and Bender will challenge their usual portrayals of abstract spaces and forms by borrowing a signature motif from the other and incorporating it into their own work. Angus will include softer curvilinear forms and Bender will integrate rectilinear and geometric lines.

Image: Kate Bender, No Words This Time, 2017, oil on canvas, 76 x 84 cm

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

 

Bird Years
       
     
Bird Years

Ellen Sleeman-Taylor

Gallery 3

12 April - Sunday 29 April 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 12 April

Exhibitions continues until 5pm Sunday 29 April

Bird Years is a solo exhibition that will showcase an enormous, scrolling work that from conception to completion over the one year it has taken the artist to complete (2017-2018). The work forms a portrait of the artists life, detailing a span of events and documenting the people she loves, the places she goes, what she thinks about and what she thinks is funny or interesting. There is a resemblance to a timeline in the format of the piece; the long, continuous roll of paper is dotted with moments from the year. These moments sit in a bed of intricate patterns that morph into one another. Within the endless rolling on of the patterning are bubbles, like tiny windows. Through the windows are scenes of contemporary life. Her subject matter is inspired by Ukiyo-e and woodblock prints and French Impressionism as well as digital collage.

Image: Ellen Sleeman-Taylor, Cheap Vacation, 2016, pencil and pen on paper, 58 x 84 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

 

UP WE GO
       
     
UP WE GO

Phillip Frankcombe

Gallery 1

22 March - Sunday 8 April 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 22 March

Exhibitions continues until 5pm Sunday 8 April

This exhibition combines Mother Nature with traditional spirituality. Taking motives and symbols from different cultures and religious, Frankcombe visually represents a creative power that relates to the inner being. This symbolism derives from English, Islamic, Buddhist, Christian and Hindu religion; the common factor being a fascination with the Divine.

Image: Philip Frankcombe, Up We Go, 2017, acrylic and oil on MDF, 84 x 36 cm.

Photo: Courtesy of the artist.

 

ARTFLUX
       
     
ARTFLUX

Christine Jarrett, Trevor Lewis, Leanne Jeffcoat, Jacqueline Wilkinson, Jeanette Zvargulis.

Gallery 2

22 March - Sunday 8 April 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 22 March

Exhibitions continues until 5pm Sunday 8 April

ArtFlux represents the journeys of friendships and expressions of collaborative art processes captured in a state of flux.

Each artist’s work connects in some way with an other even though diverse media and subject matter are used. This connection could be as a result of the sound of another’s voice in the studio or the brushing of shoulders along journeys of learning and discoveries in making art.

The art results in a variety of media including painting, sculpture, collage, printmaking, mixed media, and representations of diversity of meanings of everyday objects.

ArtFlux will be the Artpath workshop's second exhibition at M16.

Picture: Lee-Anne Jeffcoat, 2017, Good times, etching (detail).

Photo: Courtesy of the artist.

 

EARTH DREAMING
       
     
EARTH DREAMING

Barbara Hiscock Laszuk

Gallery 3

22 March - Sunday 8 April 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 22 March

Exhibitions continues until 5pm Sunday 8 April

This exhibition explores the essence of our red earth perceived beyond the physical eye, and produced in a way that incorporates the aesthetic of conceptual realism.

Image: Barbara Hiscock Laszuk, 2017, Red Earth, oil and acrylic on canvas, 100x75 cm

Photo: Courtesy of the artist.

 

Wrapped in Sky
       
     
Wrapped in Sky

Carmel McCrow

Gallery 1a

1 March - Sunday 18 March 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 1 March

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 18 March

 

“…and always there’s a keyhole, which we prisoners call a sky”

                                   Oscar Wilde

Sky…the result of an ancient explosion still in progress. The universe, still expanding, constantly changing, a living environment where sparks continue to fly. Above is the immeasurable scale and complexity of the universe, from which our minds, having immense capacity for thought and imagination, offers a vast array of manifestations. The sense of scale is majestic, inviting contemplation of the infinite, but with air and light movement constantly affecting change in colour, intensity and patterning, can also offer intimate glimpses of what may lie beyond our mundane world, to the sublime.

Image: Carmel McCrow, The sublime, 2017, oil and acrylic on canvas, 120 x 90 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

 

EVOLVE
       
     
EVOLVE

Keith Bailey, Lex Beardsell, Ian Robertson, Alan Howard, Cherylynne Holmes, Jane Styles, curated by Georgina Griffiths.

Gallery 1b

1 March - Sunday 18 March 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 1 March

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 18 March

A group of Canberra based artists who met during their tenure as National Gallery of Australia volunteer guides in 2012. The group celebrate diversity, collaboration and evolving art practice in thier mixed media show.

Image:  Alan Howard, Blue vase, 2018, White stone clay, Chun glaze, 140mm x 80mm

Alan Howard, White stoneware pair of cups, 2018, Stoneware, shino glaze, 85mm x 75mm,

Photo: M16 Artspace.

 

LOSS
       
     
LOSS

Keith Bailey

Gallery 2

1 March - Sunday 18 March 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 1 March 6pm

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 18 March

Loss is an oil on canvas exploration of loss of habitats, species of plants and animals, and landscapes globally and regionally, using abstract, semi-abstract and symbolist painting styles.

The works express the Bailey's responses to traveling around Australia and internationally, witnessing destruction of habitat, landscape and threatened species. Additionally, a focus on research and literature has highlighted the artist's call to action.

Loss investigates vast land clearing, and focuses on the dynamic visuals of The Great Barrier Reef, the Borneo jungles and the orangutan populations that inhabit, and Rhinoceri in Africa.

Image: Keith Bailey, Great Barrier Grief (detail), 2017, oil on canvas, 121 x 76 cm.

Photo: Courtesy of the artist.

 

Readymades
       
     
Readymades

READYMADES

Gallery 3

1 March - Sunday 18 March 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 1 March 6pm

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 18 March

Alex Asch, Adele Rae Cameron, Nigel Lendon

Curated by Jas Hugonnet in collaboration with Al Munro

This exhibition presents Readymades highlighting the alchemical skill of the artist to see inherent artistic merit in existing objects.

There is a hint of irreverence to the gallery context as these un-worked objects are elevated beyond the everyday and bathed in light.

Image: Nigel Lendon, Untitled Industrial Structure, 1970, Unlimited Edition. Unique artist’s copy, 50 x 51 x 17cm

Photo: M16 Artspace.

 

If you were buried for a thousand years even you would be priceless.
       
     
If you were buried for a thousand years even you would be priceless.

Alex Hobba, Patrick Larmour, Rosalind Lemoh, Darren Nedza, Timothy Phillips, Leila el Rayes, Camille Thomas

Gallery 1

8 February - Sunday 25 February 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 8 February

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 25 February

This group show of new media, sculpture, drawing and painting brings together artists from the ACT and interstate and explores ways of life and living using objects of material culture. This means still life, fragmentary images, text, the stuff of future archaeology, the stuff of contemporary anthropology. The artists involved use various approaches from detached poetic and humorous collection and cataloguing to more explicitly personal and immediate expressions.

Ways of life and living is a huge and nebulous subject, rearing its head in academic and pop culture just about everywhere from Sex and the City to Indiana Jones and bell hooks to Tolstoy. It describes everything in life that humans do. This exhibition is particularly focused around our relationship to time and the value that objects, collected or created, have for our bodies and identities inside of a connection they have with larger social structures. 

The works included explore tensions between permanence and ephemerality. Many have a starting point in the banal and familiar include shoes, knives, eating utensils, quick snap pics, protective equipment and tools. Objects that reflect the fulfilment of simple desire and necessity and are the remnants left behind of a quick decision to hold on to things symbolic of our memories or to let go.

Image: Patrick Larmour, This will keep you safe, 2017, oil on linen,  80 x 108 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

 

 

Osculate
       
     
Osculate

Jenny Lyons

Gallery 2

8 February - Sunday 25 February 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 8 February

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 25 February

Jenny Lyons has crafted Osculate from close up footage taken on the Queensland coast; focusing on the spiraling creations and disruption of bubbles in swash. It is thought that a part of the human brain is dedicated to recognising spiral patterns. This work artistically highlights these attractive and disorientating movements, encouraging the audience to decipher the work through an awareness of their own physical responses.  As one curving wave collides with another, graceful osculations are exposed in the foam and bubbles of the wash. 

Jenny Lyons work contributes to wider conversations concerning the brain and body.  Adding to those exploring the shared ideas and techniques between Australian Indigenous and Western trained artists.

Image: Jenny Lyons, 2018, Osculate 2, Image still from video

Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

 

 

It is. They are.
       
     
It is. They are.

Lauren Butler

Gallery 3

8 February - Sunday 25 February 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 8 February

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 25 February

In this collection the artist experiments with unlikely textural and media combinations to create luscious, garish and bizarre artworks that explore the notion of being present with what is. Butler employs a spontaneous and subconscious creation style such that the elements in each work appear to materialise randomly from the monochromatic canvas background. This is achieved by working intuitively, with little deliberation. As a result, the elements feel impotent and unstable. Some are held down with thread. For now they are suspended here, but there is a sense that at any second they might move, morph or subside; the same way 'now' is constantly morphing into 'then'. The strange but visually delicious works draw the viewer into the 'now' as unexpected textures, shapes, shimmers and threads are examined in detail and touched with the eyes. They are made to be viewed and absorbed in the present. They simply 'are'.

Image: Lauren Butler, Untitled #3, 2017, mixed media, 45.5 x 61.5 x 3.4cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

 

Gesture Light
       
     
Gesture Light

Rachel Bruhn

Gallery 1

18 January - Sunday 4 February 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 18 January

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 4 February

Gesture light is a collection of 1000 small watercolour paintings plus animation. The project is based on the changing colour and light that endure over a repetitive sequence. The work presents as an overall pattern and when each piece is seen individually the intimate marks and gestures are seen. The individual circles form a rhythmic articulation of time passing. 

The artist has been inspired by formal and minimalist approaches to the production of art making, and enjoys working with ideas of small precious shapes usually overlooked.

Image: Rachel Bruhn, #A001, 2016, watercolour on rag, 19 x 14.5 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

 

 

Rebirth of Reason
       
     
Rebirth of Reason

Corralee Rooney

Gallery 2

18 January - Sunday 4 February 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 18 January

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 4 February

‘Imagine if you could present your beliefs in a picture, expressed in colour?’ queries the artist. This exhibition is a series of abstract works that seeks to make us question life in a philosophical and abstract sense.

Image: Corralee Rooney, Petri Dish of Colour Theory, 2017, watercolour and ink, 129 x 92 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

 

 

 

Crises of Content
       
     
Crises of Content

Chloe Gray

Gallery 3

18 January - Sunday 4 February 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 18 January

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 4 February

Crises of Content is not a single body of work, it’s a constantly evolving dialogue of self-reflection, and this is its most current evolution. Once it was an alter ego named Collie-K, and then it was Chloe with her pet spider Jeffery. It’s always changing, always searching and always just a little strange. This is how Gray purges her anxiety, a coping mechanism to empty the artists' whirring thoughts and lock them down somewhere so she can move onto the bigger things. When things get out of control, she indulges in self-reflections of cathartic writing and making that, she has branded her Crises of Content.

Image: Chloe Gray, Untitled, inkjet on paper, 2014, 90 x 90 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

 

 

Tar Love - What Lies Beneath
       
     
Tar Love - What Lies Beneath

Chris Holly

Gallery 1

9 - 26 November 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 9 November

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 26 November

Look down. Look around, what lies beneath is Tarmac and that makes most of this town.
This exhibition is a photographic re-view of what we commonly look down upon. Tarmacadam (Tarmac), bitumen and pavements.
There is over 800,00km of roads in Australia. That’s about 30 metres for every Australian!
In its various forms it is a compelling landscape to study photographically.
This body of work is both a playful and reverential study of details of surfaces we rely on to support our daily transportation through towns and cities. It is often overlooked or ignored.
Many of the signs and remnants of daily movements we follow provide an opportunity for abstractions and graphic compositions to lift tarmac from being overlooked beneath our feet to our gaze upon the wall.
The subject treatment relies on high contrast black and white photography to emphasise the texture and roughness of tarmac. Many of the flat scenes and surfaces take on other dimensional qualities. Alongside this primary body of work is a complimentary collection of abstracted lines and markings in colour.

The exhibition will be opened by David Paterson APP.L GM.Photog Hon.FAIPP FAIPP, a well known and highly awarded Canberra photographic artist.

Image: Chris Holly, Tar Love - What Lies Beaneath (detail), 2016, black and white and colour photographic prints and inkjet on fabric, 50 x 100 cm each.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

 

Bled
       
     
Bled

Scott Pollock

Gallery 2

9 - 26 November 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 9 November

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 26 November

'Bled' is an exhibition/installation inspired by Scott Pollock's journey into the art world - how it happened, what inspires him, the process of creativity and ultimately finding his voice.

Scott discovered his creativity after having an aneurysm with a small bleed on the brain. As a side effect from the operation he had an episode of Hypo Mania. One of the symptoms of Hypo Mania is the release of heightened creativity. Although he had dabbled in sketching and writing before, never had he felt such passion or inspiration. From that moment on, he went into a whirlwind of painting, writing, painting, writing. He was obsessed.

After experiencing this, he became fascinated with how our mental state or being can be the most powerful influence on our lives - how those moments of extreme emotions can, and do, shape our lives in so many ways.

The main artwork for the exhibition captures his journey from the aneurysm through to where he is today in regards to his art. A lot of his works aim to capture those moments of extreme emotion. The exhibition space will be turned into something similar to his studio -  not only full of painting materials but also of the things that give and gave him inspiration - photos, sketches and personal items of importance - it will be a place of creativity. Among the studio his artworks will be displayed - hanging on walls, perched on easels, leaning against walls or in the bin.

Image: Scott Pollock, Jack, 2015, mixed media on canvas, 34 x 25 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

 

KW@N3$
       
     
KW@N3$

Mimi Fairall

Gallery 3

9 - 26 November 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 9 November

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 26 November

Fairall’s exhibition KW@N3$ is an exhibition of portraits that celebrate and show appreciation for  the powerful support network of women in her life.

Each mixed-media work focuses on an individual close to her and how their personalities, style, manner, and context within Fairall’s life influence and enrich her own qualities and perception of herself. Fairall’s portraits are made up of a large range of materials, colours, textures and shapes that she recognises as being associated with each individual. The amalgamation of these components portray an abstract and personalised visualisation of who and what the women in her life represent.

Image: Mimi Fairall, Un-i-digi- ed, 2016, spray paint, collage, oil pastel, acrylic, screen-print and marker on paper, 70 x 100 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

 

Drawing Comfort
       
     
Drawing Comfort

Talei Emberson, Dimity Kidston, Valerie Kirk, Suzanne Knight, Sharon Peoples, Annie Trevillian

Gallery 1

19 October - 5 November 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 19 October

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 5 November 

This exhibition features the work of six artists who explore relationships between drawing, textiles and comfort. Referencing English anthropologist Daniel Miller’s The Comfort of Things, the exhibition poses the questions of how is drawing relevant and integral to the processes of textiles and how we obtain a sense of comfort from objects. 


Image: Suzanne Knight, Pass the sugar, sugar, 2017, tapestry weaving- wool, cotton and lurex, 27cm x 40cm

Photo: Brenton McGeachie

 

Entangled Mysteries
       
     
Entangled Mysteries

Sally Blake

Gallery 2

19 October - 5 November 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 19 October

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 5 November

Entangled Mysteries is a new body of three-dimensional textile works and drawings by Sally Blake. The works reference author Craig San Roque’s story, The Kore Story / Pesephone’s Dog, and the ancient Greek myth of Demeter and her daughter Persephone. These stories teach us about cyclic patterns of decay and renewal and seasonal changes. This exhibition focuses on the time Persephone spends underground, where she can learn to understand how the world works and how plants grow from below. Using contemporary basketry practices and paper-based media, the artist creates an underground world which harbours the potential for renewal and new life in the darkness.

Image: Sally Blake, Sprouting, 2017, patinated copper wire, 23x14x14 cm. 

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

 

Infrastructure
       
     
Infrastructure

Christopher Oates

Gallery 3

19 October - 5 November 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 19 October

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 5 November

Oate’s exhibition comprises of landscapes of contemporary Canberra with a focus on the interaction of bush, gardens, buildings and infrastructure. The artist aims to highlight the contrast between the order of the roads, structures and utilities and the confusion of foliage. A particular inspiration for Oates is the uniquely clear light of Canberra. One of his aims as a painter is to show how this light falls on different forms and the angles and shadows it creates on different surfaces, both hard and soft. 

Image: Christopher Oates, Cotter Road, Winter, 2015, gouache on paper, 70 x 50 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

 

Self ID
       
     
Self ID

Curated by Tilly Davey

Gallery 1

28 September - 15 October

Opening 6pm Thursday 28 September

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 15 October

Self ID is an exhibition by residents of Ainslie Village and Canberra-based artists Tilly Davey, Lee Grant and Blaide Lallemond. The exhibition documents and explores different forms of self identity with the residents of Ainslie Village, located in Campbell.

Ainslie Village is a social housing complex that accommodates and provides services for disadvantaged individuals. Many residents of Ainslie Village live with no sense of self identification and have faced numerous roadblocks such as addiction, homelessness and mental health issues, which has left them feeling like outsiders.This exhibition demonstrates the artistic talent of the Ainslie Village residents and shows how art can create for individuals a sense of self identity and belonging.

Self ID seeks to promote the value of being self aware and how every person has their own unique self ID. 

Image: Tilly Davey, D-Man, 2016, photograph, 40 x 20 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

Templum
       
     
Templum

Michele England

Gallery 2

28 September - 15 October 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 28 September

Exhibitions continues until 5pm Sunday 15 October

Templum is an exhibition in a darkened space offering a seat and a place to contemplate a world with wilder weather, hotter oceans and all that brings. These situations are explored through retablos, altars, objects and assemblages interlaced with sound and projections. 

Image: Michele England, Barramys parvus (too late), 2017, gouache on board, 23 x 30cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

Amplified
       
     
Amplified

Andrea McCuaig

Gallery 3

28 September - 15 October 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 28 September

Exhibitions continues until 5pm Sunday 15 October

Amplified is a body of work that addresses themes of dance and gestural painting. The artist states, “In my art practice I am constantly researching potential relationships between dance movement and gestural painting. I am searching for relationships, commonalities and differences between movement in 3 dimensional space and the potential trace effects of these movements in 2 dimensional works of art.”

Viewers are encouraged to walk by the work using their own movement as a vehicle for encounter with the works. The process of walking alongside these paintings will reveal illuminated highlights in the paintings.

Using the natural physical engagement between the space and the audience, the artist’s aim is to enable the viewer to feel as though they have animated the gesture in the paintings and that they are situated within the works themselves. 

Image: Andrea McCuaig, Untitled, 2016, acrylic on board, 180 x 240 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

Internationalist
       
     
Internationalist

Gallery 1

7 – 24 September 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 7 September

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 24 September

Curated by Kirsten Farrell

What does it mean to be an artist in Canberra in a globalised world? Does work made in Canberra match it with contemporary art practice in other parts of the world or are we still just gazing longingly at the centre from the margin?

Internationalist is a speculative curatorial experiment, curated by Kirsten Farrell, in which three Canberra artists are paired with an international artist to test these ideas. The six artists have engaged with each others’ practices to produce work for the exhibition at M16 Artspace.

The pairs of artists are byrd (aka Dan Maginnity) with Shannon Goff (USA); Nicci Haynes and Chihiro Gompei (Japan); and Sarah Rice is joined by Italian artist Vanessa Alessi who lives in Berlin.

Farrell was given the opportunity to curate the exhibition while in her former role as Exhibition Coordinator at M16 Artspace. Her residency in Italy last year, supported by Canberra Contemporary Art Space and the RESÓ network in Turin, made her question the meaning of international connections in her own and others’ practices.

Artists: Vanessa Alessi (Italy), Shannon Goff (USA), Chihiro Gompei (Japan), Nicci Haynes, Dan Maginnity (aka byrd), and Sarah Rice.

Image: courtesy of www.freeimages.co.uk

The unconscious is a rectangle
       
     
The unconscious is a rectangle

Tony Curran

Gallery 2

7 - 24 September 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 7 September

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 24 September

The Unconscious is a Rectangle combines irrational abstraction with the programmatic and procedural rigour of screen-printing. Extending his exploration of the digital-organic, Canberra-based artist Tony Curran has collaborated with Sydney’s Throwdown Press Master Printer Ben Rak, to make an edition of screen-prints to test how a work can convey a “human touch” without the presence of a brush-mark or gesture. Using the commercial language of the CMYK halftone dot as a way to translate RGB (digital colour), Curran has created optically intense patterned shapes that use highly saturated colours to evoke pixels, textile weaves and confetti.

Image: Tony Curran, Inside the shadow / Outside the shadow, 2016, acrylic screenprint on BFK Rives, 56 x 38 cm. Photo: courtesy of the artist.

Empty Vessels and Full
       
     
Empty Vessels and Full

Kerry Shepherdson & Georgina Leith

Gallery 3

7 - 24 September 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 7 September

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 24 September

In these two intersecting bodies of work, both artists re-purpose a product. Kerry re-contextualizing ‘meaningless’ packaging into containers for meaning. On the other hand, Georgina empties text of its surface meaning and transforms it into a container for aesthetic meaning.

Kerry explores visual haptics, iterative patterns and colour glazing in her painting.  Her work in Empty Vessels and Full continues this exploration. Referencing the shapes of deconstructed cardboard packaging she investigates positive and negative space and explores a fascination with packaging design and the aesthetic value of discarded material.

Georgina’s work explores text as a package for meaning.  Taking the shapes of text and manipulating these, she empties the text beyond its surface meaning, to explore its deeper resonance as a form and how it can take on a new aesthetic life.

 

Image: Kerry Shepherdson, Untitled, 2017, 70 x 70 cms, acrylic on canvas.

Photo: by Brenton McGeachie.

Lines of Site: Finding the Sublime in Canberra
       
     
Lines of Site: Finding the Sublime in Canberra

Curated by Grace Blakeley-Carroll

Gallery 1

Artists: Jacqueline Bradley, Cathy Franzi, Kirstie Rea, Mark Mohell, Annika Harding, Caren Florance and Melinda Smith

17 August - 3 September

Opening 6pm Thursday 17 August

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 3 September

Lines of Site: Finding the Sublime in Canberra features the work of seven diverse artists whose practices are informed by Canberra. Jacqueline Bradley, Cathy Franzi, Kirstie Rea, Mark Mohell, Annika Harding, Caren Florance and Melinda Smith explore the area and its history from different perspectives. The exhibition includes a variety of media: glass, photography, video art, painting, ceramics, sculpture, letterpress and poetry. Each artist has found the sublime in Canberra, and in some cases it is not where you might expect.

 

Public Programs:
Sunday 20 August at 2pm
Book Launch of Members Only by Caren Florance and Melinda Smith
To be introduced by Kate Armstrong (content development, interpretation and collection management, Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House).

Sunday 27 August at 2pm
Floor talk with exhibition curator Grace Blakeley-Carroll and exhibiting artists Jacqueline Bradley, Cathy Franzi, Kirstie Rea, Mark Mohell, Caren Florance and Melinda Smith.

Sunday 3 September at 12pm
Curious Concert by the Griffyn Ensemble
Presenting a series of new works inspired by the exhibition Lines of Site. Grab a pencil and participate in the Interval Composition Challenge to hear your music performed for Father's Day.

 

Image: Caren Florance & Melinda Smith, 1962: Be Spoken To, 2014-17, letterpress and screenprint on rag paper, housed in archival Tyvek ‘ghost bag’. Photo by Brenton McGeachie.

Photo: Brenton McGeachie.

Transit Lane
       
     
Transit Lane

Christine Jarrett, Jeanette Zvargulis, Joanne Hogan, Leeanne Jeffcoat, Jacqueline Wilkinson

Gallery 2

17 August - 3 September 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 17 August

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 3 September

Transit Lane represents the journeys of four women and their teacher through the Diploma of Visual Arts.

Image: Leeanne Jeffcoat, Transition 1, 2017, mixed media on paper, 62 x 42 cm; image courtesy of the artist. 

The Structure of Things
       
     
The Structure of Things

Al Munro

Gallery 3

17 August - 3 September 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 17 August

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 3 September

The paintings in the exhibition, The Structure of Things, continue Munro's interest in exploring the way textile characteristics, such as pattern and structure, allow us to reconsider the spaces of scientific imaging.  This work draws on research into the relationship between various weave structures and the structures which inform molecular matter to explore connections between the two.

Image: Weave Distortion (Homage to Anni Albers), 2017, acrylic on birch panel, 40 x 40cm

Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

Material World
       
     
Material World

M16 Studio Artists

Gallery 1

27 July - 13 August 2017

Exhibition opens 6pm Thursday 27 July

Exhibition continues until 5pm 13 August

‘Touch’ is the focus of the annual M16 Artspace Studio Artists’ 2017 exhibition. Artists consider touch - through their choice of materials and how they use them - to convey meaning in unique ways. Touch is a term that implies both physical and emotional experience: to be touched, inspired and/or appeal to the sense of touch through subject, object, medium and method implying touch of the maker’s hand. 

The exhibition will be opened by Gordon Ramsay, Minister for the Arts and Community Events, ACT. 

Curator's floor talk by Dr Suzanne Moss on Saturday 29 July at 12pm.

Artists: Carmel McCrow, Val Gee, Angela Bakker, Sarah Murphy, Marje Seymour, Tony Curran, Jacob Potter, Bronwyn Davies, Jane Dunn, Phil Page, Fiona Little, Jodie Cunningham, Robin Setchell, Megan Jackson, Katy Mutton, Johanna Butler, Sanne Koelemij, Kate Murphy, Leanne Crisp, Di Broomhall, Derek O'Connor, Nicola Dickson, Jodie Cunningham, Ella Whateley, Meelan Oh, Kerry Shepherdson, Katherine Campbell, Andrea McCuaig, Elizabeth Faul, Suzanne Moss.

 

Image: Di Broomhall, Nomads Light IV, 2016, oil on canvas, 120 x 90 cm. Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

Orchestrated Chaos
       
     
Orchestrated Chaos

Rasha Ajaj

Gallery 2

27 July - 13 August 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 27 July

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 13 August

In this seemingly unending era of global conflicts, loss, displacement and distorted histories, the lines of truth are often blurred. This exhibition examines how the forces of globalisation influence our values, beliefs, cultural acceptance and practices.

Using both traditional and modern techniques, the artist works with composition within compositions as a way of challenging the notion of subjectivity to which we are conditioned. Ajaj illustrates this through evoking the space between the things that disappear and reappear in different forms and at different times to suit the dominant narrative.

Rasha Ajaj, Orchestrated Chaos (detail), 2017, multimedia projection, 2000 x 750 mm. Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

Hands on Studio
       
     
Hands on Studio

Various Artists from Hands on Studio

Gallery 3

27 July – 13 August 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 27 July

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 13 August

This exhibition showcases works by Hands on Studio members. The works explore story-telling and were all produced from Hands-On classes in 2017.

Hands On Studio is an arts organisation at M16 Artspace which seeks to “provide people with disabilities access to an art education. One of the studio’s objectives is to provide these artists with as many opportunities as possible to exhibit in mainstream gallery spaces.” 

Image: Installation shot of 'Hands On Studio' exhibition in gallery 3.

Figurative Visions: Three Artists; Three mediums
       
     
Figurative Visions: Three Artists; Three mediums

Roger Beale, Rick Cochrane, Chan Dissanyake

Gallery 1

6 - 23 July 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 6 July

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 23 July

Artist Talks - 

Sunday 9th July from 2pm- Roger Beale

Sunday 16 July from 2pm- Rick Cochrane

Sunday 23 July from 2pm- Chan Dissanyake

Three Canberra artists with different styles, using different mediums and with different visions share a commitment to figuration. In this exhibition Cochrane showcases his expressive drawing and printmaking focusing on the figure in action. Dissanyake’s work is contemplative – revealing the beauty of Australian light and atmosphere by using the potential of watercolour. Beale’s pastels of landscapes and the urban form focus on moments of change and light. 

Image: Roger Beale, Bangkok Tollway, 2016, pastel on Sennelier paper.

Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

Liminal Landscapes
       
     
Liminal Landscapes

Amandeep Kaur

Gallery 2

6 - 23 July 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 6 July

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 23 July

 In this exhibition, Amandeep Kaur experiments with digitally created photomontages that have layers of deliberately fabricated liminal spaces in which the idea of the self is explored. Amandeep creates the works using digital photographs of various local and foreign spatial environments that she has visited in the recent past. Her works are often women centric and question the displacement, dislocation and also the connections and negotiations of women through the journey of transmigration. In Liminal Landscapes the possibilities of belonging to multiple places and the merging of local and global environments has been explored through multiple narratives.

Image: Amandeep Kaur, untitled, 2016, digital print, dimensions variable.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

www.amardeepshergill.com

 

Skating on Thin Ice
       
     
Skating on Thin Ice

Keith Bailey

Gallery 3

6 - 23 July 2017

Exhibition opens 6pm Thursday 6 July

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 23 July

Skating on Thin Ice consists of oil paintings alternating with black and white photographs depicting Antarctica, its melting ice and the animal populations that will be greatly impacted by this phenomenon. In 2012, the artist travelled to Antarctica on an expedition and experiences on that journey are explored through this body of work. 

Image: Keith Bailey, Emperors on Ice, 2017, oil on canvas, 77 x 52cm. 

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

Underneath Tomorrow
       
     
Underneath Tomorrow

Gemma Bonshek Kane, John Hart, Saara March, Steve Roper

Gallery 1

15 June –  2 July 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 15 June

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 2 July

Underneath Tomorrow explores the subconscious imagination. The works all share elements of processing memories, childhood experiences and family myths. Hart pursues ideas around knowledge, truth and uncertainty. Roper's perennial investigations into the subconscious and memory lead him on this occasion to depictions of devils, demons and infernal scenes. He represents these in a cartoon-like style to evoke childhood fears and anxieties and their recurrence in adult life.Kane’s sculptures explore the intrinsic connection between people, place, and memory. March uses a diverse range of assembly techniques in exploring thoughts and memories.

Image: John Hart, Tathagata Buddha, the Father Buddha said, ‘with our thoughts we make the world, 2016, five colour screen print, 50 x 70 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

6 Cubic Centimeters
       
     
6 Cubic Centimeters

Manuel Pfeiffer

Gallery 2

15 June –  2 July 2017

Opening Thursday 15 June 6pm

Exhibition continues until Sunday 2 July 5pm

6 Cubic Centimeters (of prostate cancer) is a drawing exhibition by Manuel Pfeiffer that documents his experience with prostate cancer. Pfeiffer’s drawings highlight the process of his cancer from the initial shock of being diagnosed in December 2015, to the aftermath of his operation when it was removed in May 2016, and the following radio-therapy in 2017. The work encompasses the artist’s fears, thoughts and reactions associated with his diagnosis.


Image: Manuel Pfeiffer, Fear Eats Reason Away, 2016, pencil on paper, 59.4 x 42cm

Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

Faces in Watercolour
       
     
Faces in Watercolour

Jill Mail

Gallery 3

15 June –  2 July 2017

Opening Thursday 15 June 6pm

Exhibition continues until Sunday 2 July 5pm

As an artist who has always painted in water colour, Mail hastaken on the challenge to paint portraits from life in this medium.

The artist states 'I attempt to paint swiftly but accurately and to convey a likeness and personality of the sitter.  I do not take photographs. Water colour is unforgiving but I continue to persevere & enjoy the struggle with this fascinating medium.  Sometimes I am pleased with the result.'

 

Image: Jill Mail, pencil and watercolour on Arches paper,

38 x 28cm.

Photo: Meredith Jaffray.

 

The Darkness Torch
       
     
The Darkness Torch

Louisa Giffard

Gallery 1b

25 May - 11 June 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 25 May

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 11 June

Woodcuts are a black medium, a solid slab of darkness: the black must be removed to create the image, to reveal the light. This exhibition explores the difference between additive and subtractive media - the woodcut, where one must cut away to create light, photography, where the work is created and destroyed by light, and painting, where one frequently adds darkness to create the visual space.

Darkness is the absence of light, rather than its own substance, one that artists control and create, adding and layering and thickening, shining a torch of darkness onto a page to reveal an image.

Watercolour and woodblock are opposite ways of working. Watercolour requires the artist to start from pure light, and add darkness– for without the dark, the light cannot be seen, the image cannot be recognised. Woodblocks require the artist to cut away the space around the line, subtractive drawing, working in reverse.

How does the medium affect the perception of the work? Why does a watercolour image feel so different from a woodblock – is it the way the light glows through the paint, making the white seem brighter? The transparency of watercolour’s layered colours and shadows, compared to the solid, aggressive black of a woodcut? How easy is it to reverse one’s relationship to light?

Some art is created by light alone. Light is necessary to create photographs, but it is also a variable that can very easily destroy the image the artist wants to create. In addition to woodcuts and watercolour, some of the works in The Darkness Torch are “failed photographs” – marred by light leaks, wrongfully selected exposure, grain or blur – that have been used as a drawing surface and recontextualised. Here, the artist has not created the light, or removed the dark, but must work with what the camera captures, relinquishing control, and embracing the dark.

Image: Louisa Giffard, There Will Be Blood, 2017, woodblock print, 19.7 x 30 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

The age of meaninglessness has ended, Art, Empirical and Ideal
       
     
The age of meaninglessness has ended, Art, Empirical and Ideal

James Rowell

Gallery 1a

25 May - 11 June

Opening 6pm Thursday 25 May

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 11 June

The age of meaninglessness has ended, Art, Empirical and Ideal is about the differences between ‘empirical’ art and ‘ideal’ art explored through painting. The artist states “... [‘empirical’ art is] where the eye is annoyed by having a general sense of visual confusion compared to ‘ideal’ art, which is much more homogenous and governed by an idea.”

Image: James Rowell, Karl Marx, An ideal version of image No. 1, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 45 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

The Elm Forest
       
     
The Elm Forest

Janet Angus and Fairlie Pearce

Curated by Hannah Webb

Gallery 2

25 May - 11 June 2017

Opening Thursday 6pm 25 May

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 11 June

The Elm Forest showcases how two artists’ have collaborated to explore similar paradoxes in their works across different mediums. By combining Janet Angus’ and Fairlie Pearce’s approaches to the exploration of both the sublime and morbid, the exhibition will present a micro-forest of majestic animal human hybrids that have evolved from the artists’ drawings, prints and paintings of forest wildlife.

Image: Fairlie Pearce, Wolf Sadv, 2017, watercolour on paper, 29.7cm x 21cm x 1.5mm 

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

Labyrinths of the Mind
       
     
Labyrinths of the Mind

Sholto Morton

Gallery 3

25 May - 11 June 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 25 May

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 11 June

Morton’s Labyrinths of the Mind is an exhibition of paintings with complicated compositions, radiant colour and flowing rhythms. There is no one single motif but an abundance of abstract images. The works are produced with no set plan; lines are built in harmony but spiral together en masse to create an intense and obsessive maze of linear agitation. The works seek to explore the interplay of line and colour and metaphorical paths that people seldom wander.

Image: Sholto Morton, The Eye, 2017, ink on paper, 20 x 20 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

Recent Small Paintings
       
     
Recent Small Paintings

Martin Paull

Gallery 1a

4 - 21 May 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 4 May 2017

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 21 May

Artist Statement

These paintings take inspiration from the Canberra region. Several depict roads, or have roads in their titles. The places may be familiar to many- the landscape viewed from the car on the way from Canberra. I use photographs taken on my phone as the starting point for the work. The paintings are made possible by: the car, Canberra’s road-connected location and our ability to instantly capture these moments.

My work has recently tended towards the miniature - small scale paintings are more achievable in limited time. Small paintings invite intense observation and focused attention – this makes possible a strong connection with the art and the represented landscape. Some of the paintings echo allegorical themes; titles such as Saul Doing 140 on the Way to Cooma reflect this.

Image: Martin Paull, The Lead Road to Cooma, 2016, oil on lead sheet on board, 8 x 10 cm. Photo: courtesy of the artist.

Together Apart
       
     
Together Apart

Keith Bailey, Lex Beardsell, Ian Robertson, Alan Howard, Cherylynne Holmes, Jane Styles

Gallery 1b

4 - 21 May 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 4 May 2017

Exhibitions runs until 5pm Sunday 21 May

Together Apart is an exhibition by a group of Canberra-based artists who are all voluntary guides at the National Gallery of Australia. The exhibition is being shown during Volunteers Week in the ACT and celebrates diversity and collaboration in art practice.

Image: Keith Bailey, Fire Storms and Flooding Rains (detail), 2017, oil on canvas. Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

The Palm House
       
     
The Palm House

Gallery 2

4 - 21 May 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 4 May 2017

Exhibitions runs until 5pm Sunday 21 May

Artist Statement

Inside the Palm House at the Kew Gardens, the trees grow amidst rusted rails. Hot from the beaten iron and the glass, the Palm House is steamy and thick with chlorophyll.

Kew has trees from all times and places. They grow next to each other, making friends, meeting where they would not have met but for this unnaturalness. Odd varieties are here and there, sharing soil, chatting.

Back in the Palm House the sprinklers are on. Light filters in. A tourist kid tugs on a fern. Evening settles slowly and people leave. The lake outside has a quiet ripple. Old light sits sunken into leaves, dark and purple green. A stone cherub in the lake spouts black water. Two people escape, shoes tapping on their exit path.

This exhibition puts people in unexpected places. With many layers of oil paint they become part of their environments until they’ve settled in comfortably, even if getting to that point was a bit arduous. They came from other times and places, some real, some less real. They’ve taken months and months to settle, and truthfully a few are still a little at odds with their new homes. Whether this is a frustration or an interesting quirk, is hard to say. 

Image: Jessica Bock, Wall, 2016, oil on canvas, 101 x 76 cm. Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

Green Space: scenes from the Bush Capital
       
     
Green Space: scenes from the Bush Capital

Thea Katauskas

Gallery 3

4 - 21 May 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 4 May 2017

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 21 May

This new body of work presents street views of suburbia, moments from Canberra’s quiet streets, and reflects the importance of the planted environment to our local communities.

Continuing Katauskas' interest in recording historic buildings and green spaces of Canberra, these recent paintings seek to capture views of the inner suburbs. A unique sense of space and form make them easily recognisable as old neighbourhoods of the Bush Capital. The compositions include not only examples of iconic architecture from a past era, but also celebrate the significant role of trees and shade in defining our living spaces, both public and private.

The effects of light, shadow, space, and the love of trees are all part of this latest collection of distinctly Canberran scenes.

Image: Thea Katauskas, Afternoon Gum and Cherry Blossom, Ainslie, 2017, oil on linen, 76 x 51 cm. Photo: courtesy of the artist.

Beyond Worlds and Words
       
     
Beyond Worlds and Words

Brooke Jarvis, Chris Ramsey, Julie Delves, Kate Bender

Gallery 1

13 April –  30 April 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 13 April

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 30 April

Beyond Worlds and Words is a conversation between four artists who depict their inner worlds with diverse approaches. Both together and in moments of self-reflection, the artists contemplate the philosophical nature of the emotional and spiritual self within a psychological sphere.

Image: Kate Bender, Untitled (immersed Four), 2016, oil on canvas, 122 x 90 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

Breathing Space
       
     
Breathing Space

Ella Whateley

Gallery 2

13 – 30 April 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 13 April

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 30 April

Breathing Space is a show that seeks to live up to its name. 
Ella Whateley’s painting Breathing Space 1: Into the New Creation hangs in the centre of the exhibition space; the work provides, through its presentation of light and space, and the suspension of gravity, a visual focus for a multi-sensory experience. It is accompanied by a sound piece composed by Benjamin Drury in response to a shared desire to engage the audience in new ways about what it means to be embodied and alive.  Challenging what a painting is and can do, and what music is and can do, Breathing Space offers the visitor an invitation to slow down and contemplate. 

Ella Whateley is a visual artist currently engaged in post-doctoral research in Painting at the School of Art, Australian National University.

Benjamin Drury is a composer and sound artist studying at the ANU School of Music. His practice encompasses experimental, jazz and popular music, with a focus on acoustics, texture and sound-design.

Image: Ella Whateley, Breathing Space 1: Into the New Creation, 2016, acrylic, gouache and oil on linen, 150 x 130cm

Photo: Brenton McGeachie

 

To view a video of the installation please click https://youtu.be/ilVMuZllafU

New Work
       
     
New Work

Philip Alldis

Gallery 3

13 April –  30 April 2017

Opening Thursday 6pm 13 April

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 30 April

Alldis uses drawing in charcoal to explore the direct juxtaposition and visual segmentation of imagery within a single picture plane.

Finding interest in images removed from their context, Alldis’ accumulation of image-upon-image creates conceptual associations which emerge by chance and move from the impersonal to the personal.

Image: Phil Alldis, Q, 2016, charcoal and wax on canvas, 71 x 56 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

m8
       
     
m8

Joel Arthur, Riley Beaumont, Chris Burton, Christopher Dalzell (Walrus), Rowan Kane, Millan Pintos-Lopez, Mikhaila Jurkiewicz, Kael Stasce

Gallery 1

23 March – 9 April 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 23 March

Exhibition continues until 5pm 9 April

This exhibition of eight artists highlights the way relationships between each others’ practices has evolved and how conceptual and aesthetic inspiration has developed in each individuals’ work.

Image: Kael Stasce, Intersection 2 (detail), 2016, steel and acrylic paint, 60 x 68.5 x 22 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

The Onlooker
       
     
The Onlooker

Meg Keating & Samuel Johnstone

Gallery 2

23 March – 9 April

Opening 6pm Thursday 23 March

Exhibition continues until 5pm 9 April

The Onlooker raises questions about what it means to participate in contemporary screen culture and about the fair use of imagery and image data within this culture. The use and proliferation of imagery is such a mainstream activity however digital visual culture is generally unregulated, increasingly the moral, social, ethical and legal ramifications of this exchange economy are becoming problematic.

In the digitalised world of Facebook, Google image search, 24 hour news reportage, Pinterest, surveillance and the like, the act of observing and viewing is always linked to the camera or screen, which act as both medium and mediator. In these platforms images are shared, liked, edited and copied with ever-increasing speed and ease. Such imagery and its related data become surrogates for real world experience. In the capturing, downloading and displaying of images intentionally comes into play. In this realm media, mediation and display raises questions about ownership, agency and copyright of this material.

Light is used in this context as a metaphor for 'other' and acts as a conduit where image data, information, and access can be transformed into sensory engagement. The aim of this work is to provide a bodily engagement and real world experience from a range of sources that do not always offer one. It is the intention that the white void of the screen and other light sources unsettle the viewer through simultaneous revelation and concealment. By controlling and varying this source the works aim to explore the instability of viewing and the transient nature of contemporary image culture.

Image: Megan Keating & Samuel Johnstone
The Onlooker, 2017, animation still.


Image: courtesy of the artists and the University of Tasmania

Paradise Lost
       
     
Paradise Lost

Caroline Ambrus & Lucile Carson

Gallery 3

23 March – 9 April 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 23 March

Exhibition continues until 5pm 9 April

Paradise Lost explores the breakdown of society and destruction of the environment due to human greed and activity.  

Artist Caroline Ambrus explains, "the elite tried to find other planets but their fragile space craft steered them to a space-fired inferno. Those who stayed on earth fell from great height into a 9/11 cauldron.  

"The images of bolting horses breaking free from earthly constraints represents the conquest of nature over human folly. The hexagon format represents fragmentation of reality into eternal, universal patterns,” says Ambrus.

Lucile Carson, co-artist in Paradise Lost, says about her work, "These works are like drought maps, exploring the impact of climate change, drought and human behaviour on the landscape.”

For these works, the artist has manipulated the canvas surface by using dirt and pigments from crushed rocks, alongside more traditional artist materials such as bought paint. Carson then incorporated onto the canvas surface recycled objects she has found whilst walking throughout Australia’s natural landscapes, inclusive of pieces of thread and wire.

For her, "...it is the transformation of the materials – taking the discarded, lost, broken, and obsolete; giving them a new form and place that has become an important driver of my work. This process seems to tie together a new narrative with and elevated aesthetic inherent in this act of alteration. For Paradise Lost, I continue this process but I am examining humans as a marker both in and on the landscape and in a wider philosophical sense."

Caroline Ambrose, Paradise Lost, 2017, mixed media on caneite, 5000 x 1500 cm

Image: courtesy of the artist

8 Paintings
       
     
8 Paintings

Yanni Pounartzis

Gallery 1a

2 - 19 March 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 2 March

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 19 March

In 8 Paintings Pounartzis’ continues on his project of “the creation of mystery through illusionary forms”. 
 
This series sees Pounartzis deviate from his previous works which focused on a series hovering planes to shapes which actually penetrate the canvas.
 
It further demonstrates his unwavering determination to fool the eye through colour and shade. Since the strokes are in oil and without the aid of masking, the compositions demand confident mastery. 
 
The compositions are carefully considered, but at the same time, Pounartzis’ process can be spontaneous and not overly planned. There’s always a sense of unexpected placement.
 
“I take what could be considered wrong in a painting and somehow find a way to make it right,” says the artist.

Image: Yanni Pounartzis, Untitled, 2017, oil on polyester, 55 x 55 cm.

Kinetic Light
       
     
Kinetic Light

John Carolan & Dominic Aldis

Gallery 1b

2 - 19 March 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 2 March

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 19 March

Kinetic Light is an exhibition featuring the work of Canberra-based artists John Carolan and Dominic Aldis. They examine the way we perceive projected light forms through movement, interaction and materiality using interactive technology, and mixed media traditional art forms.

John Carolan's work Gesture uses movement and the body to render light on a structure composed of wood, cardboard and other materials, simulating a canvas the viewer can ‘draw’ on using light.

Through this, the artist is a facilitator, offering the viewing audience the tools to manipulate form and composition.

The iridescent colours invite a sense playfulness from viewer, with the interactive elements challenging the idea of art being static and immovable.

John Carolan is a digital artist who uses new technology to transform the gallery space.

Drawn to light is a work by Dominic Aldis that utilizes hand drawn animation, using ink and coffee, to project light onto piano rolls.

The animation captures the subtle movements and depth of the human form. Intertwined with the texture of the paper, the projected light gains a sense of weight and physicality.

The flowing forms of the animation as they formulate on the paper aims to lull the viewer into examining its intricate shapes over time.


Image: John Carolan, Gesture, 2017, interactive installation, projection, dimensions variable.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

Faded Crush
       
     
Faded Crush

U.K. Frederick

Gallery 2

2–19 March 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 2 March

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 19 March

Faded Crush is an exhibition of video, print and mixed media works exploring fandom, celebrity and desire expressed through popular music cultures.

This exhibition aims to bring into focus the personal   experiences and emotions that underpin the mass production and consumption of popular music. It explores the relationship between fame and anonymity and the iconic and mundane by engaging with ideas of fandom and the vernacular expressions it generates.

Image: U.K. Frederick, Faded Crush: Madonna #1, 2015, solvent transfer on Rosa Pina paper, 60 x 40 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

Time Takes Too Much Time
       
     
Time Takes Too Much Time

Dean Cross

Gallery 3

2–19 March

Opening 6pm Thursday 2 March

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 19 March

Through the production of two-dimensional drawings and collages, Cross investigates scars in our landscape. The ever-present understanding that there is no separation between landscape and self in Indigenous culture complicates the pictures and draws attention to the rapid and expansive changes our continent has undergone over the past 200 years.

Time Takes Too Much Time ambitiously looks forward to an Australia where both physical and cultural scars are no longer sore points, but folds within the strata of our nation.

Cross born and raised on Ngunnawal country, and his ancestral roots lie within the Worimi Nation.

Image: Dean Cross, Untitled 2016, drawing in archival pigment ink on Hahnemule cotton paper. Photo: courtesy of the artist.

Orpheus Island
       
     
Orpheus Island

Kurt Brereton

Gallery 1

9 February – 26 February 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 9 February

To be opened by Senator Richard Di Natale

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 26 February

The exhibition, Orpheus Island (the myth of Orpheus calls), employs labour intensive embroidery (hand stitching) on oil painting, encaustic paintings, installation and performance video. The show draws attention to coral bleaching on Great Barrier Reef.

Organic wax (encaustic), graphite and oil are also symbolic of our dependence on fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas). The recurring motif of the coal hill deposit (noting the recently approved massive Indian based Adani mine near Gladstone) counter balances the horizontal deposits of coral reefs. The irony is that both coal and coral take such a long time to be created yet such a brief moment in geological time to be destroyed

There is now an ominous wasteland connotation to these colourful reefs as they inexorably bleach (white out) to the ashen greys of calcified coral skeletons.

 

The more these unique tourist meccas are destroyed, the more desperately we seek to turn back the rising tides - as we wage rear guard actions against the impacts of our technological successes and global consumptions.

For future generations the only coloured reefs may well be those 3D virtual hyper-real simulations of immersive technologies and the nostalgia of analogue museum dioramas.

Image: Kurt Brereton, Coal to Coral Progression No. 5/6 (detail), 2016, oil, embroidery on canvas, 122cm x 167cm each panel.

Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

 

Polarising Colour
       
     
Polarising Colour

Gallery 2

David Keany and Georgiy Potopalskiy

9 – 26 February 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 9 February

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 26 February

Image: David Keany, Untitled, (installation still detail) 2016, 35 mm slide, polarising filter, dimensions variable.
Photo by the artist

This exhibition is an international collaboration between Canberra artist David Keany and Ukrainian sound artist Georgiy Potopalskiy producing a sound and light installation. This installation is the realisation of many years’ experimentation and research into the aesthetic possibilities of light waves and polarising filters.
 
Keany explains: “Light waves are usually multi-orientated but after passing through a polarising filter, become oriented in one direction. With two polarizing filters crossed, the light is practically eliminated. If disruptive materials are placed between the two filters, beautiful colours are produced.

“Rotating one filter changes colours in a startling and definite way. Many types of plastic films are used in this project to produce variations of the dramatic colour changes. Some films are crinkled while others are stressed. There is also overlapping of different films in different orientation which can produce subtle colours that also change as the filter continues to turn.”
 
In this project, 80 different thin transparent plastic films are mounted in 35mm slide mounts and projected with a 35mm slide projector onto the screen. Each slide is unique and may contain several layers or manipulated plastic films, projected in an 80 minute cycle

Potopalskiy has composed one hour of electronic music referring to Keany’s slides. The music and images will be not synchronised, and so different combinations of images and sound arise over a number of cycles.
 
Keany’s fascinating and eclectic career includes seemingly divergent activities such as Painting Conservator at the Australian War Memorial and as a collaborative dance and performance artist. His collaboration with Potopalskiy continues in Kiev in May this year with a live performance of Polarising Colour.

The Plate Show
       
     
The Plate Show

Gallery 3

9 – 26 February 2017

Opening 6pm Thursday 9 February

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 26 February

The Plate Show is version two of the Bookplates exhibition, which was held at Electric Shadows Bookstore in 2015. The original concept was art on plates produced by a group of Canberra artists that regularly eat together.

This second iteration, curated by Katie Hayne and Ursula Frederick, will similarly include contemporary art responses by local artists to the dinner plate.

The artists in The Plate Show are: Alyssa Bagley, Emma Beer, Byrd, Adele Rae Cameron, Fiona Edge, Kirsten Farrell, Ampersand Duck, U.K. Frederick, Michelle Hallinan, Katie Hayne, Nicci Haynes, Stephanie Jones, Waratah Lahy, Peter McLean, Julia Miller, Johanna Rendle-Short, Sarah Rice, Joanne Searle, Megan Watson, Jen Webb and Naomi Zouwer.

Image: Naomi Zouwer, Domestic Archeoloogy 1, 2017, digitally printed decals of original painting on side plate, 20cm diameter.

Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

 

Intersections
       
     
Intersections

Bryna Bambury, Nikki Chopra, Eliya Nikki Cohen, Chelsea Kalogiannidis, Holly Tranter

Gallery 1

19 January – 5 February

Opening 6pm Thursday 19 January

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 5 February

This exhibition presents the intersection of five peoples’ experiences of daily life in their natural environments. Using different mediums - painting, ceramics, photo prints and lithographs –their experiences are both celebrated and analysed.

Image: Chelsea Kalogiannidis, Untitled, (detail) 2016
Oil and synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 15 x 15cm.

Photo: Bryna Bambery. 

 

aethër
       
     
aethër

Lucy Palmer

Gallery 2

19 January – 5 February

Opening 6pm Thursday 19 January

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 5 February

Canberra is hosting the prestigious Ausglass Conference in 2017 and to coincide M16 will be exhibiting colour field glass sculptures by Lucy Palmer. The artist was awarded the 2016 Australian Decorative and Fine ArtsSociety’s grant, which is supported by Canberra Glassworks. In 2014, Palmer graduated from the University of South Australia with Honours in Visual Arts, majoring in glass.

Image: Lucy Palmer, Sky Wedge, Bullseye glass, aluminium, 100 x 100 x 60 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

The Earth Element: Life's Fragility
       
     
The Earth Element: Life's Fragility

Marilyn Stretton

Gallery 3

19 January – 5 February

Opening 6pm Thursday 19 January

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 5 February

Having previously investigated the elements of air and water, Marilyn Stretton explores the micro aspects of the elements of earth. This exhibition is a continuation of her series of exhibitions relating to the four elements.

Image: Marilyn Stretton, Silver Bark Study 1, acrylic on canvas, 2016, 40 x 30 cm.

Photo: courtesy of the artist. 

NEW WORK
       
     
NEW WORK

Brenton McGeachie and Martin Paull

Gallery 1

18 October - Sunday 4 November 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 18 October

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 4 November

A joint exhibition by Martin Paull and Brenton McGeachie, both-long term Canberra based artists, exhibiting paintings, drawings and photographs. This exhibition explores interpretations of landscape and sense of place.

Image: Brenton McGeachie, Untitled, 2018, pigment ink on hehnemulhe paper, detail.

Photo: courtesy of the artist.

Bloom
       
     
Bloom

Jodie Cunningham

Gallery 2

18 October - 4 November 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 18 October

In the exhibition ‘Bloom’ artist Jodie Cunningham exhibits a body of works on paper that use the languages of geometric abstraction, colour and symbolism. They journal her experiences of conflict, anxiety and heartbreak; and the joys of connection, love, and gratitude. Like an alchemist she transforms the energy of complex and sometimes negative emotions into vibrating, ‘blooming’ compositions.

The process Cunningham has used to create these images has been developed in the context of her busy life as a single mother and educator. In the rare moments she has to herself, during the early hours of the morning when sleep evades her, she creates images as a way of processing emotions and thoughts.

On a daily basis she immerses herself in colour, shape and pattern in an almost therapeutic meditation – resulting in an eclectic collection of image ‘seeds’. Selected images are further developed and refined, then printed in archival inks on gorgeous cotton rag paper.

Image: Jodie Cunningham, 2018, A little much for me, Digital print on fibre rag 310gsm

FEET ON THE GROUND
       
     
FEET ON THE GROUND

Lucille Carson and Ruth Hingston

Gallery 3

18 October - Sunday 4 November 2018

Opening 6pm Thursday 18 October

Exhibition continues until 5pm Sunday 4 November

This exhibition focuses on Ruth Hingston and Lucille Carson’s extensive and ongoing observations of human interaction and activity with and on the landscape. Featuring the local Canberra urban and suburban landscape, both artists observe the swiftness and increased impact of our human footprint.

Image: Lucille Carson, The Flying Fish, 2018. Mixed Media, (detail) 13cm x 6cms

Photo: Tim Brook.