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Layers of Time: the Kimberley Jul 31, 2014 - Aug 17, 2014 — M16 Gallery 01
Peter Bailey Jul 31, 2014 - Aug 17, 2014

STUDIOS, WORKSPACE, GALLERIES, EVENTS

 

Between a Rock and a Hard Place

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    2013.08.06

  • 2013.08.06

  • 2013.08.06

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    2013.08.06

  • 2013.08.06

Dan Stewart-Moore: An exploration of Artefacts from the cognitive dissonance of climate change
When Aug 22, 2013 12:00 PM to
Sep 08, 2013 05:00 PM
Where M16 Gallery 02
Contact Name
Contact Phone (02)62959438
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Dan Stewart-Moore

When Leon Festinger illuminated the field of psychology with his theory of ‘cognitive dissonance’ in 1956, he couldn’t have imagined that his discovery would prove to be a vital link in the battle for action against climate change. Cognitive dissonance occurs when two conflicting beliefs are held by a person, resulting in a feeling of discomfort or unease.

Cognitive dissonance is common-place in climate sceptic rhetoric. However, in this exhibition I am exploring an object that can be considered physical evidence of this phenomenon.

Pre-cast concrete Tetrapods are sea wall components. They are extremely popular in Japan where approximately half the coastline is fortified with concrete. The cognitive dissonance associated with Tetrapods is obvious when the emissions of concrete are considered. 4% of all greenhouse gas emitted into the biosphere comes from concrete – more than twice the total emissions of Australia. Ironically Tetrapods are both an adaptive defence against sea level rise and a considerable contributor to global warming.

Using the form of Tetrapods I’m exploring positive and negative space and the link between wealthy nations, who are more likely to survive climate change and many Pacific nations who are already emigrating to higher ground.

Dan Stewart-Moore is a PhD candidate at the ANU School of Art and a sessional lecturer in the school’s foundation program. His research focuses on climate change psychology and low emission materials and techniques.

“My work is a beast with its own mind and soul that I attempt to shackle to concepts and principles. My intent is not to wrestle my work into a box or allow it to be subjugated by my ego. Instead I aim to be an intermediary between what I learn, what I feel and the physical process of making an artwork.”

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