Real and virtual printmaking – collecting prints in a digital age
       
     
Confident Collecting 2018: Ahead of the Curve
       
     
Real and virtual printmaking – collecting prints in a digital age
       
     
Real and virtual printmaking – collecting prints in a digital age

Session 2: Monday 23 July from 6-8pm

Erica Seccombe and Nicci Haynes

Award winning artists working across print media and experimental digital platforms

Join artists Nicci Haynes and Erica Seccombe for an evening discussing collecting printmaking in a digital and virtual age. Both Seccombe and Haynes trained and traditional printmakers working with etching, lithography and serigraphy. Rather than turning their backs on tradition, both artists have extended their practices to include animation, video and digital processes.

Conscious of the relationship of printmaking to natural history, for some years now Seccombe has been working with the ANU Department of Applied Mathematics and Vizlab, NCI investigating time-resolved (4D) micro-X-ray Computed Tomography through immersive stereoscopic digital projection installations and 3D printing. In June her animation of 3D CT tomographic data titled Metamorphosis won the $50,000 Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize at the South Australian Museum.

Haynes video of drawing and dance ‘Drawing and Me’ won the 2017 M16 Artspace Drawing Prize and was collected by the National Gallery of Australia. Haynes’ work often explores communication, or more precisely miscommunication and communication difficulties. While she doesn’t consider herself a performance artist, her current work investigates the performance of drawing – the actions and movements of creating a drawing, creating works in which dance is a form of drawing and her drawings dance on the video monitor.

Ticket prices

$ 30 per session

A limited number of tickets will be available at the door.

To purchase tickets visit

https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/m16-artspace-confident-collecting-2018-ahead-of-the-curve-tickets-47905337153?utm_term=eventurl_text

Image: Erica Seccombe, Microplastica, 2017, 3D printed objects from 3D Micro-CT, rendered in Drishti.

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Confident Collecting 2018: Ahead of the Curve
       
     
Confident Collecting 2018: Ahead of the Curve

Confident Collecting 2018: Ahead of the Curve

starts Monday 16th July, 6-8 pm.

Image: Richard Whiteley, Absent, 2016, cast and carved glass, 300 x 250 x 140 mm (HWD)

This is a 4 part series of illustrated talks at M16 Artspace through Mondays in July and August from 6-8 pm. We previously explored what drives us as art collectors and learnt our way around the arts marketplace. In this 3rd series we meet with eminent artists to better understand and inform our collecting in the midst of a changing art world.

Visual art is about change. Increasingly, as artists explore changes in the society around them, they cross traditional boundaries. Sculpture can be bronze or digital, painting can be performance, glass can emerge from a love of fibre or history, textiles can adorn bodies and walls, ceramics no longer need to be utilitarian.

In this series we delve more deeply into the diversity of art forms available to us as collectors. We will see and learn through an artist’s eyes. Every week we introduce a new visual arts form and enter into the journeys of two artists who express their creativity within that artform. We will explore glass, print media(including digital), ceramics and textiles, delving more deeply into what we collect, exploring the diversity of visual art forms and the journeys of the makers themselves as they cross traditional boundaries.

Over the following three wintry Monday nights, M16Artspace will continue to turn up the heat, having attracted an impressive lineup of leading arts practitioners. Known luminaries in the fields of print media, ceramics and textiles include Erica Seccombe, Nicci Haynes, Julie Bartholomew, Patsy Hely, Valerie Kirk, Ruby Berry and Jennifer Robertson.

Participants will be welcomed with a glass of wine, nibbles and a viewing of the current M16 Artspace exhibitions.

Vasiliki Nihas Series Curator and Chair of M16 Artspace

Dates

Monday 16th July – Glass

Richard Whiteley

Associate Professor and Head of the Glass Workshop at School of Art and Design, ANU

Jenni Kemarre Martiniello

Award-winning Arrernte glass artist

Monday 23rd July - Print Media

Erica Seccombe and Nicci Haynes

Award winning artists working across print media and experimental digital platforms

Monday 30th July - Ceramics

Julie Bartholomew

Head of Ceramics, School of Art and Design, Australian National University, Canberra.

Patsy Hely

Highly collected ceramic artist and researcher

Monday 6th August - Textiles

Valerie Kirk, Jennifer Robertson, Ruby Berry,

Canberra based textile artists with international profiles.

Ticket prices

$ 30 per session

$ 100 for the series of 4

A limited number of tickets will be available at the door.

To purchase tickets visit

https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/m16-artspace-confident-collecting-2018-ahead-of-the-curve-tickets-47905337153?utm_term=eventurl_text

(Note: Friends of M16 get a free ticket at the door, to one session this year)

Extended Bios of presenters:

Richard Whiteley became an apprentice in stained glass at the age of sixteen; he holds an undergraduate degree from The School of Art + Design, Australian National University (Glass) and a Master’s degree (MFA, Sculpture) from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Whiteley was a board member for the Visual Art Board of the Australia Council from 2009-2011 and now serves as a peer for this organisation. His works are held in major museums and private collections worldwide, including the Australian National Gallery, the Corning Museum of Glass, Corning NY and the Toledo Museum, OH. He has undertaken a major commission for power company ActewAGL as part of the enlarged Cotter Dam in Canberra. He has also received many research grants to develop creative works and perform research. These include research on a major glass-recycling project with a Sydney based company, Refire Glass and he is currently leading a multidisciplinary research team (Art, Physics/Engineering and Classics) who are looking at the manufacturing processes of ancient Roman cameo glass.

Jenni Kemarre Martiniello is a prolific artist and writer whose forays into the medium of glass have been highly successful. A graduate of the Australian National University School of Art, Martiniello was introduced to glass as a medium for her artwork during a group residency at the Canberra Glassworks in 2008. IndigiGlass08: Postcards from the Referendum was created to mark the 40th anniversary of the 1967 Aboriginal Referendum and involved four artists who had been working together as part of the Indigenous Textile Artists Group (ITAG). Canberra Glassworks and associated artists taught them new techniques for their art with highly successful results. Martiniello was a finalist in the 2011 Ranamok Glass Prize with her Eel Traps and her works are now in some significant public and private collections. Jenni’s strong connection to the Canberra arts community comes from her involvement across a long list of different mediums. From majoring in sculpture at university to screen printing at Megalo to her studio at the Canberra Glassworks, Jenni has built a wide skill set and an impressive list of achievements.

Nicci Haynes has a Bachelor of Science (Hons) from University College Cardiff (1985) and a Bachelor Fine Arts (Hons) from the ANU in 2007. Her practice incorporates drawing, print, books and awkward little videos. Haynes’ work usually has something to do with communication (difficulty). Her current focus is performance-based although she says ‘I hesitate to call myself a performance artist: my performances are mostly restricted to my studio, and even there the thought of being seen through the window is embarrassing’. Haynes’ work is held in various Australian and international collections, including the Australian National Gallery and State Library of Queensland.

Erica Seccombe lectures in Foundation Studies at the ANU School of Art & Design, and convenes the course Figure & Life and teaches into Vision & Perception. She also lectures for The Centre for Art History and Art Theory, and has convened the courses for Australian Modernism, Cyberculture and first year Art History.

Erica is a visual artist based in Canberra. She was recently awarded the prestigious 2017 Capital Arts Patrons CAPO Fellowship. Her practice spans from traditional and photographic print media to experimental digital platforms using frontier scientific visualisation software. Erica's PhD, GROW: experiencing Nature in the Fifth Dimension is practice-led research investigating time-resolved (4D) micro-X-ray Computed Tomography through immersive stereoscopic digital projection installations and 3D printing. Her interdisciplinary research is facilitated by the ANU Department of Applied Mathematics.

Dr Julie Bartholomew is an artist and Head of Ceramics at the School of Art and Design, Australian National University, Canberra. Her practice traverses the boundaries of art and contemporary issues exploring consumer culture and global branding within the context of western and eastern cultures. Recently her work focuses on environmental issues. Julie has participated in major exhibitions and residencies in Australia and abroad, including solo shows at Kuandu Museum and the Taipei Artist Village in Taiwan. Julie has been the recipient of four Australia Council for the Arts New Work Grants, Tokyo Studio Residency, Australia-China Council Red Gate Residency in Beijing and the Asialink Taiwan Residency.

Dr Patsy Hely, Professor Emeritus at ANU, is an artist working predominately in the ceramic medium. Her work is held in many collections including the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, the National Gallery of Australia and the Powerhouse Museum. She worked as an academic from 1989 – 2014, most recently at the ANU School of Art where she convened the Honours and Graduate Coursework programs and where she is currently an emeritus fellow. Her practice also encompasses writing and curating, with essays published in national and international publications. Currently she works as an independent artist and writer.

Ruby Berry is a Canberra based textile artist who creates sculptural textiles works with sensory engagement. She has been showing across Australia in solo and group exhibitions since graduating from First Class Honours at the Australian National University School of Art in 2014. Her work has been selected for Talente in Germany and for the Wangaratta Textile Award and she was mentored throughout 2015 by Megan Jackson as part of the ANU EASS Mentorship Award.

Valerie Kirk is an artist and tapestry weaver, writer, teacher and public figure who has made a significant contribution internationally. While actively maintaining her practice as an artist, Valerie’s remarkable capacity for achievement has seen her inspire and lead community tapestry projects, research Australian Indigenous textiles, direct significant projects, guest lecture on international textile tours and create major works.

During 2004-2013 she was commissioned to design and weave five major tapestries to celebrate Nobel/Japan Prizes in Science associated with the Australian National University. Awards such as the Australia Council New Work grant, ACT Creative Arts Fellowship, Muse Arts Woman of the Year Award and the Canberra Centenary Community Tapestry project mark substantial success and her artwork is documented in the Telos Portfolio Collection publication.

Jennifer Robertson studied at West Surrey College of Art and Design, Royal College of Art, UK and Fondazione Arte della Seta Lisio, Florence, Italy. She migrated to Australia in 1986, established a weaving studio in Fremantle, WA and joined the staff at the ANU School of Art in Canberra in 1997. She is an internationally renowned woven textile specialist and she researches, lectures and exhibits internationally and nationally. Her works are held in public collections including Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, New York, USA, NUNO Corporation, Tokyo, Japan, National Gallery of Australia, Art Gallery of South Australia, Art Gallery of Western Australia, and the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, alongside numerous private international and national collections.

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